New .xxx domain available after more than ten years of debate

by Dale Wright

Yesterday saw the launch of the newest sponsored top level domain, or sTLD, that users can pick out when registering a new domain for their website. It’s the much-debated ‘.xxx’ which has finally been created for the adult industry after being proposed more than ten years ago.

The first attempt to approve .xxx was opposed in 2000. It was re-proposed in 2004 and has been the subject of constant debate ever since.

Although not yet available for sites to use, adult companies can reserve their .xxx domain with the ICM Registry any time in the next 49 days to ensure it is theirs on the official go-live date. Celebrities and brands are also being given the chance to claim their .xxx domain so that it cannot be bought by another company or used by cybersquatters. Where businesses actually using their .xxx domain will pay an annual fee through a normal domain registrar, ‘blocking’ a domain so that it cannot be purchased just requires the celebrity or brand to pay a one-off fee of a few hundred pounds.

Campaigners for tougher parental controls hope that the new domain will make it easier for
parents and guardians to filter adult material, meaning that children will be less likely to come across it by accident (or on purpose). Although there are some concerns in the industry that this kind of blanket ban will open the floodgates for censorship online, most people in the adult industry agree that that giving people choice is a good thing.

Of course, some campaigners argue that it will also make the content easier to find, but this is at least partially why the adult industry are so keen on the new sTLD. Parents will undoubtedly find it easier to set up their firewall software to enforce blanket bans on these new .xxx domains if they feel it is necessary.

With internet access on games consoles becoming commonplace, we may also see a move
from games console makers to automatically ban access to .xxx websites if the consoles
are used by a minor and set up with a parental lock. Providing the child does not know the
password or a hack to get around the restriction, this could be a very effective way of controlling what your child is doing online.

Do you think the new .xxx domain will make your kids safer?

  • http://www.mjilahr.com Edison Shroff

    I am impressed with this site, really I am a big fan.